Scoresheet

I am tracking a score sheet for features explained versus objections raised.

Confirmation Documents

August 28 A sad day as I have decided to no longer allow Hermitian to submit comments on this blog as he has now, several times accused me of behavior for which he has no evidence (hinting that I may be the forger, work for Obama, that I withhold data or manipulate data and other non sequiturs). I feel saddened because, despite his short comings, he did serve a useful purpose. I wish him well and will continue to address issues he raises, to help him understand better why the Xerox workflow stands unassailed. Thank you Hermitian for your efforts to debunk the work flow, helping further strengthen it.

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Obama Long Form Birth Certificate – Kerning

A birther named, paraleaglenm, shows us how a regular type writer can create what appears to be kerning. Kerning is the process of changing the spacing between characters, typically using a proportional font. This means that the spacing between characters is not constant. However, as he/she shows, such artifacts can also be created using a regular typewriter, by typing at different speeds.

Use your ‘rectangular marquee’ tool to count/isolate pixels between the letters ‘ny’ in Kenya, and ‘ty’ in the  111ty and ty examples. I touch-typed ‘Kenya’ with strong, quick strokes on the ‘ny’ in order to create a 2 to 3 pixel overlap, or kerning, of the ‘n’ foot and the ‘y’ serif. That is a fully typed word. The ’111ty’ was typed in normal, even rhythm, and your marquee tool will isolate 2-3 pixels  between the t and y. That is normal platen movement.

The final ’ty’ was typed with index fingers of the left and right hand in a quick succession, straining the spring tension indexing of  the platen . . . recreating the expert’s ‘kerning’ in a mechanical typewriter . . . something he said was impossible. Using ‘hunt & peck’ fingers instead of touch-typing created an exaggerated ‘kerning’ effect of 4 pixels overlapping.