Xerox 7655 PDF – Layers and scaling/rotation

I am using Adobe Illustrator to simplify matters for some people who do not appreciate low level tools. For those people: You can click on the image and bring up a larger version.

As various other people have documented, the WH document contains several monochrome bitmaps and a single JPEG encoded background. It’s these features which caused some concern amongst those who insist that President Obama’s LFBC must be fraudulent. I can now share with you that the Xerox 7655 PDF reproduces these features.

First the multiple layers

Xerox LayersNote how the background (JPEG) layer is scaled 48% (0.48*150=72 PPI)

Xerox BackgroundAnd the foreground layers are scaled 24% (0.24*300=72 PPI). This also shows that the background resolution is half the foreground resolution, although I doubt that Hermitian will immediately grasp this concept.
Xerox mostly foregroundOh and did I mention that both images are rotated -90 degrees.

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21 thoughts on “Xerox 7655 PDF – Layers and scaling/rotation

  1. NBC

    You previously posted images of the Xerox 7655 and 7535 PDFs after the files were opened in Adobe Illustrator. In each case the page orientation was landscape. The 7535 image was up-side-down relative to the 7655 image. You posted no rotation or scaling data for these images.

    Now you post new images for the Xrox 7655 PDF also from Illustrator. This time however you show the images in the portrait orientation and you provide the rotations and scalings to achieve these images.

    Collectively these images prove that the rotation and scalings were applied to the earlier Iandscape images after the PDF files were opened in Illustrator. Consequently these manually applied rotations and scalings were not in your Xerox/Preview workflow. Your hypothesis of machine forger was already on shaky ground because you require a Xerox operator to place the original upside-down on the glass and a Preview operator who rotates the image by 180 degrees. Now you require a third operator to rotate and scale the images within Illustrator.

    None of these operators are required by my Forger. He personally performed all required operations. The WH LFCOLB PDF contains all rotations and scalings because the Forger manually applied them when he assembled his nine digital images within in Illustrator. All of the rotations and scalings were written to the PDF file.

    These rotations and scalings are then automatically applied when anyone subsequently opens the WH LFCOLB PDF in Illustrator.

    So your latest images from the Xerox 7655 together with the earlier images that you posted are proof that your Xerox/Preview forger indeed doesn’t have the right stuff. The Xerox/Preview forger cannot produce all of the operations without the assistance of now three human operators.
    We now know that because the final rotations and scalings were applied manually to the landscape images to achieve the portrait orientation and final page size.

    So the current score is one human forger for me and three for you.

    So your theory of a Machine forger has been reduced to a discussion over semantics.

  2. You previously posted images of the Xerox 7655 and 7535 PDFs after the files were opened in Adobe Illustrator. In each case the page orientation was landscape.

    Yep.

    Now you post new images for the Xrox 7655 PDF also from Illustrator. This time however you show the images in the portrait orientation and you provide the rotations and scalings to achieve these images.

    Yes, after saving with Preview.

    You’re still not getting it… Geez Hermitian…

    Getting ready for his next fail in 3…2….1….ouch…

  3. Your hypothesis of machine forger was already on shaky ground because you require a Xerox operator to place the original upside-down on the glass and a Preview operator who rotates the image by 180 degrees. Now you require a third operator to rotate and scale the images within Illustrator. Your hypothesis of machine forger was already on shaky ground because you require a Xerox operator to place the original upside-down on the glass and a Preview operator who rotates the image by 180 degrees. Now you require a third operator to rotate and scale the images within Illustrator.

    ROTFL.. You are really clueless are you not… Wow

  4. From Hermie’s posting, I can deduce that he has not opened the 7535 Preview pdf in Illustrator yet. Has he even managed to find the posting yet?

  5. That took all of 6 minutes, including the time spent writing two comments mocking Hermie.

  6. That took all of 6 minutes, including the time spent writing two comments mocking Hermie.

    Well, he does invite some scorn… Come on, how clueless can any person be… really… I am a patient person but he really appears to be a slow learner, if at all.

  7. NBC

    “”Now you post new images for the Xrox 7655 PDF also from Illustrator. This time however you show the images in the portrait orientation and you provide the rotations and scalings to achieve these images.””

    “Yes, after saving with Preview”

    HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

    “I can now share with you that the Xerox 7655 PDF reproduces these features.”

    Well you conveniently left off that “saving with Preview” part in your last post where the Xerox image was shown in portrait orientation. That’s what always happens with you slippery types who just don’t have the right stuff. You have to just make stuff up.

    So I’ll translate for you again. You actually did apply the rations and scalings manually in Illustrator and thereby became the third forger in your workflow. But given the fact that you already had two operator/forgers in your workflow and given my last post you suddenly realized that a third operator/forger would then be required. And you realized that three operator/forgers would be too many — especially if the third operator/forger was making his manipulations with Illustrator.

    So you did a quick backpedal and are now claiming that the portrait orientation images were produced after the PDF was opened in Preview. Thus, you are now admitting that the rotations and scalings were applied manually by the Preview operator/forger and therefore you don’t need the third operator/forger to apply the rotations and scalings in Illustrator.

    So your bottom line is that the rotations were not applied manually in Illustrator but rather in Preview. And we are to believe that that makes everything OK.

    So again you have just proved that your Xerox forger doesn’t have the right stuff. So your Xerox guy requires help from either two or three operator/forgers.

    My Forger didn’t need help from anyone. He did the deed all by himself.

  8. The manual operations in NBCs workflow:

    1. Place original document upside down on document feeder of certain models of Xerox WorkCentres.
    2. Select “Scan to email…” and select destination.
    3. Open file sent from Xerox.
    4. Rotate 180 degrees to make it right-side up
    5. Save As PDF

    That is the sum total of the manual steps required to generate a scanned PDF file with attributes matching that of the WH LFBC PDF. No scaling required, and only a single 180 degree rotation. All other artifacts are generated automatically.

  9. So I’ll translate for you again. You actually did apply the rations and scalings manually in Illustrator and thereby became the third forger in your workflow.

    Nope. You are still not getting it. Where have you been in the last few weeks where I walked you through the result.

    Scan on xerox, open in preview, rotate 180 degrees to correct for the upside down picture and save.

    That’s all. No need from 2 or three operators… Simple work flow.

    Sigh…

  10. No scaling required, and only a single 180 degree rotation. All other artifacts are generated automatically.

    After weeks of examples and helping out our friend, he still is not getting it?
    Wow…

  11. My Forger didn’t need help from anyone. He did the deed all by himself.

    Your forger appears to have been the Xerox WorkCentre…

    Well done

  12. I have been thinking about why the WH LFBC was scanned upside down. It is easy to make this mistake of course especially if you are scanning on the glass instead of using the document feeder. I have done it before. I believe that the existence the two certified copies obtained Judith Corley two days before the release on April 27, 2011 was only known among a small group of people including Robert Bauer, Judith Corley, Jay Carney, and the President of course. It is possible the scan was done by Ms Corley or Mr. Carney rather than someone who normally handles scanning documents for publication on the White House web site. They would therefore been less likely with the operation of the machine and how the originals have to be oriented.

    This would not have been a document that Corley would have just given to just anyone to have scanned. They wanted no leaks before the actual release on April 27th. The release was carefully planned and executed for maximum effect to shut up the idiot Trump and get the focus of the news back on more important things.

    After emailing he document to themselves they opened to check the results and had to rotate it in Preview before saving the file. Then on the morning before the release of the document and the press conference this person emailed the file to the person responsible for posting it to the WhiteHouse.gov web site.

  13. Change that to read “They would therefore have been less likely to be familiar with the operation of the machine and how the originals have to be oriented.”

  14. My boss invariably sends faxes upside down. And I have a tendency to send blank faxes – the previous fax machine had a face down feeder, this one is a face up feeder. Mind you, we’ve had the current fax for about 4 years – I rarely use the thing.

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