WH 7655 Experiments

I am getting closer to having all the necessary data and images to make my case. Since it makes sense to do a final confirmation of one’s hypotheses, I decided to print out a better version of the WH LFBC (with halos) and have them run through a Xerox WorkCentre 7655 Scanner.

I performed three successive scans, once with the document the righ-side-up, once with the document upside-down USD. The USD versions were rotated 180 degrees and printed using Preview (USDRotPrev).

The Mixed Raster Compression is not perfect but it consistently recognizes the signature block, the date stamp (2011) and the mostly text. All jpg files contain the ‘YCbCr’ comment tag.

[UPDATE: I ran across an interesting factoid. If you use the feeder upside down, you get a different behavior than if you place the document upside down on the platen glass. So I did a final experiment WH7655USDFed.pdf. I realized the possibility when the .pdf’s failed to open sideways in Illustrator. Now I know why…]

CCW: Counter Clockwise
CW : Clockwise

WH7655V1.PDF (10 monochrome bitmaps, 1 JPEG, CCW) Signature Block, 2011 Date Stamp, Mostly Text, Junk, Basketweave background.

  • WH7655V1-010.pbm
  • WH7655V1-009.pbm
  • WH7655V1-008.pbm
  • WH7655V1-007.pbm
  • WH7655V1-006.pbm
  • WH7655V1-005.pbm
  • WH7655V1-004.pbm
  • WH7655V1-003.pbm 2011 Date 42×228
  • WH7655V1-002.pbm Signature 205×778
  • WH7655V1-001.pbm Mostly Text 1459×1826
  • WH7655V1-000.jpg 1656×1280

WH7655V2.PDF (7 monochrome bitmaps, 1 JPEG, CCW) Signature Block, 2011 Date Stamp, Mostly Text, Junk, Basketweave background.

  • WH7655V2-007.pbm
  • WH7655V2-006.pbm
  • WH7655V2-005.pbm
  • WH7655V2-004.pbm
  • WH7655V2-003.pbm 2011 Date  42×281
  • WH7655V2-002.pbm Signature   205×778
  • WH7655V2-001.pbm Mostly Text 1459×1826
  • WH7655V2-000.jpg 1656×1280

WH7655V3.PDF (5 monochrome bitmaps, 1 JPEG, CCW) Signature Block, 2011 Date Stamp, Mostly Text, Junk, Basketweave background.

  • WH7655V3-006.pbm
  • WH7655V3-005.pbm
  • WH7655V3-004.pbm
  • WH7655V3-003.pbm 2011 Date 42×281
  • WH7655V3-002.pbm Signature 205×778
  • WH7655V3-001.pbm Mostly Text 1459×1826
  • WH7655V3-000.jpg 1656×1280

WH7655USDV1.PDF WH7655V2.PDF (5 monochrome bitmaps, 1 JPEG, CW) Signature Block, 2011 Date Stamp, Mostly Text, Junk, Basketweave background.

  • WH7655USDV1-005.pbm
  • WH7655USDV1-004.pbm
  • WH7655USDV1-003.pbm 2011 Date 45×276
  • WH7655USDV1-002.pbm Signature 204×780
  • WH7655USDV1-001.pbm Mostly Text 1462×1827
  • WH7655USDV1-000.jpg  1656×1280

WH7655USDV2.PDF (4 monochrome bitmaps, 1 JPEG, CW) Signature Block, 2011 Date Stamp, Mostly Text, Junk, Basketweave background.

  • WH7655USDV2-004.pbm
  • WH7655USDV2-003.pbm 2011 Date 45×278
  • WH7655USDV2-002.pbm Sig 204780
  • WH7655USDV2-001.pbm Mostly Text 1462×1827
  • WH7655USDV2-000.jpg 1656×1280

WH7655USDV3.PDF (4 monochrome bitmaps, 1 JPEG, CW) Signature Block, 2011 Date Stamp, Mostly Text, Junk, Basketweave background.

  • WH7655USDV3-004.pbm
  • WH7655USDV3-003.pbm 2011 Date 45×278
  • WH7655USDV3-002.pbm Signature 204×780
  • WH7655USDV3-001.pbm Mostly Text 1462×1827
  • WH7655USDV3-000.jpg 1656×1280

The final set was opened in Preview and printed to PDF

WH7655USDRotPrevV1.PDF.pdf

  • WH7655USDRotPrevV1-005.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV1-004.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV1-003.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV1-002.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV1-001.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV1-000.jpg

WH7655USDRotPrevV2.PDF.pdf

  • WH7655USDRotPrevV2-004.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV2-003.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV2-002.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV2-001.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV2-000.jpg

WH7655USDRotPrevV3.PDF.pdf

  • WH7655USDRotPrevV3-004.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV3-003.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV3-002.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV3-001.pbm
  • WH7655USDRotPrevV3-000.jpg

First quick check

grep 'YCbCr' *.jpg

Binary file WH7655USDRotPrevV1-000.jpg matches
Binary file WH7655USDRotPrevV2-000.jpg matches
Binary file WH7655USDRotPrevV3-000.jpg matches
Binary file WH7655USDV1-000.jpg matches
Binary file WH7655USDV2-000.jpg matches
Binary file WH7655USDV3-000.jpg matches
Binary file WH7655V1-000.jpg matches
Binary file WH7655V2-000.jpg matches
Binary file WH7655V3-000.jpg matches

And double check

find . -name '*.jpg' -exec jpeginfo -C {} \;

./WH7655USDRotPrevV1-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  246614 "YCbCr" 
./WH7655USDRotPrevV2-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  246750 "YCbCr" 
./WH7655USDRotPrevV3-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  246142 "YCbCr" 
./WH7655USDV1-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  246614 "YCbCr" 
./WH7655USDV2-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  246750 "YCbCr" 
./WH7655USDV3-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  246142 "YCbCr" 
./WH7655V1-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  248158 "YCbCr" 
./WH7655V2-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  247862 "YCbCr" 
./WH7655V3-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  247706 "YCbCr"

WH7655USDFed.pdf (4 monochrome bitmaps, 1 JPEG, CCW) Signature Block, 2011 Date Stamp, Mostly Text, Junk, Basketweave background.

  • WH7655USDFed-000.jpg 1656×1280
  • WH7655USDFed-001.pbm Mostly Text 1457×1832
  • WH7655USDFed-002.pbm Signature 203×787
  • WH7655USDFed-003.pbm Date 2011 46×248
  • WH7655USDFed-004.pbm

Still the JPG iComment s there…

./WH7655USDFed-000.jpg 1656 x 1280 24bit n/a   N  238742 "YCbCr"

32 thoughts on “WH 7655 Experiments

  1. NBC

    Have you tried printing out a full sheet of repeated basket weave pattern (you might have to print an oversize sheet then trim to 8-1/2 x 11 to get it printed to the edge.)? Then print or copy the AP jpg on that sheet. This would be an easier test to try than ordering a box of security paper if you could even find it. Such a test would clearly demonstrate the effects of the Edge Erase and clipping mask.

    I believe this would also result in less of the text being grabbed with the form into the background jpg. I think you know why.

  2. On an interesting side note.

    Over at the FOGBOW, Fava has linked to an article that talks about the WorkCentre 7535 creating errors in the document when OCR is turn OFF. The author suggests that it is related to the JBIG2 compression algorithm replacing numbers with other numbers that it calculates are the same. Like the pixel for pixel matches that occur on the LFBC PDF.

    http://www.dkriesel.com/en/blog/2013/0802_xerox-workcentres_are_switching_written_numbers_when_scanning

    The PDF of the contains 8-bit layers and 1-bit layers (one 8-bit and one 1- bit per page) None of the 8=bits seem to have any information on them just the white paper background.

  3. That’s hilarious Gorefan. The Xerox is a real forger🙂 Yes JBIG2 can lead to errors. I am still hoping on a JBIG2 analyzer.

  4. RC: Have you tried printing out a full sheet of repeated basket weave pattern (you might have to print an oversize sheet then trim to 8-1/2 x 11 to get it printed to the edge.)?

    You are reading my mind… Little steps though… I want to first look at the data I do have before I set off to address the clipping and cropping and the halos…
    The full separation of the signature block, which was confused by some birthers as evidence of a forgery, is far more helpful in making the case.

  5. Hermitian: I guess Anonymous didn’t want to associate himself with the Xerox Killer !

    It shows a level of irony that we now have another example of a Xerox ‘forger’… And how it also destroys another Hermitian position: namely, a Xerox Work Centre does use JBIG2…

  6. “a Xerox Work Centre does use JBIG2”

    And a Xerox WorkCentre was used by the White House less then two weeks before the WH LFBC PDF was created. The 2010 tax returns were also compressed by JBIG2.

  7. NBC

    WH7655V1.PDF (10 monochrome bitmaps, 1 JPEG, CCW) Signature Block, 2011 Date Stamp, Mostly Text, Junk, Basketweave background.
    “•WH7655V1-010.pbm”

    I was not aware that .pbm handles monochrome color.

    See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netpbm_format

    “PBM is for bitmaps (black and white, no grays)[3]”

    [3] PBM specifications

    http://netpbm.sourceforge.net/doc/pbm.html

    “Each pixel in the raster is represented by a byte containing ASCII ‘1’ or ‘0’, representing black and white respectively. There are no fill bits at the end of a row.”

    The text is not Black and the near Black color is uniform across the entire 1 Bit layer.

    The near-Black color is different for each 1 Bit layer.

    YOU LOSE ACE !!!

    What a waste of time !

  8. The text is not Black and the near Black color is uniform across the entire 1 Bit layer.

    The near-Black color is different for each 1 Bit layer.

    Check out how PDF does it. I gave you all the data.. It sets the color of every single bitmap…

    My goodness sakes, how clueless can you be? You do understand the concept of imagemask? And how to set individual colors of imagemasks?

  9. I cannot believe how easily confused our friend is. Yes, PBM is used for B&W bitmaps, which is what the FlateDecode images are. They are imagemasks and their color is set by a simple set color command.

    Why would one use gray scale bitmaps to store monochrome data.

    Hilarious, the more Hermitian posts the more he indicts himself.

  10. NBC says:

    August 6, 2013 at 20:17

    “”Hermitian: I guess Anonymous didn’t want to associate himself with the Xerox Killer !””

    It shows a level of irony that we now have another example of a Xerox ‘forger’… And how it also destroys another Hermitian position: namely, a Xerox Work Centre does use JBIG2…

    According to Gorefan, Xerox sometimes uses JBIG2.

    And according to an earlier post JBIG2 randomly changes numbers.

    In my field, changing the numbers is an absolute no no !

  11. According to Gorefan, Xerox sometimes uses JBIG2.

    And according to an earlier post JBIG2 randomly changes numbers.

    In my field, changing the numbers is an absolute no no !

    Your point… That when using the normal setting, it uses JBIG2. My goodness sakes my friend, data does not digest well in your system now does it?

  12. NBC

    “I cannot believe how easily confused our friend is. Yes, PBM is used for B&W bitmaps, which is what the FlateDecode images are. They are imagemasks and their color is set by a simple set color command.”

    HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
    So you think that you get to just make up those monochrome colors and then insert your favorite colors into the PDF by a manual edit ? Because that’s the only way they are going to get there since your antiquated .pbm format only does B & W.

    OK Ace ! How about going back to some of your earlier bitmaps (your analysis of the WH LFCOLB using your freetoy tools would be a good choice). And list out the RGB color numbers for each non-background layer from your analysis.

    And I’m still waiting to get your list of which of your tools can’t handle JBIG2 and/or FlateDecode.

  13. So you think that you get to just make up those monochrome colors and then insert your favorite colors into the PDF by a manual edit ? Because that’s the only way they are going to get there since your antiquated .pbm format only does B & W.

    Nope, PDF provides for a much better approach. You can set the color of the monochrome bitmap. Of course it does only B&W it’s an imagemask…

    Geez… How much handholding do I have to do here…

  14. P.S.

    And then we can compare your color values with those measured and reported by Mara Zebest say eight to 10 months ago.

  15. OK Ace ! How about going back to some of your earlier bitmaps (your analysis of the WH LFCOLB using your freetoy tools would be a good choice). And list out the RGB color numbers for each non-background layer from your analysis

    Already done. Perhaps you do not read PDF very well but this time I am going to let you find it because this is getting just too painful for me to watch…

  16. And I’m still waiting to get your list of which of your tools can’t handle JBIG2 and/or FlateDecode.

    All tools handle FlateDecode which is a simple format. JBIG2 is not recognized by pdf-parser.py so it just dumps the raw stream. I have not tested QPDF.

    I am not sure why you cannot do your homework?

  17. And then we can compare your color values with those measured and reported by Mara Zebest say eight to 10 months ago.

    ROTFL.. you are many months behind here… Oh my god… This is getting ridiculous. I outlined how the color of the monochrome ImageMasks is being set and it went straight over Hermitian’s head.
    Now he somehow hopes that the colors do not match… Do you really believe that I am that clueless🙂 Well, you do but that seems to be caused more by your lack of familiarity with these issues, so I forgive you my apprentice friend.

  18. Did you miss my postings on the gory details of the WH PDF and how the color of the monochrome layers is being set?

    Sloppy

  19. In my field, changing the numbers is an absolute no no !

    And yet you think it’s perfectly fine to use OCR on text at half the minimum recommended resolution.

  20. Hermie would be jealous of a goldfish’s memory – if he could remember what a goldfish was.

  21. His expertise appears to be limited to using Illustrator and perhaps other high level tools but when it comes to understanding how, internally, a PDF works, I have found him to be somewhat lacking.

    Why would you use a gray scale bitmap format for a monochrome imagemask? What a waste of storage… Especially when the goal is to optimize for size…

    Has he even looked at the PDF raw data for Obama’s birth certificate? Has he figured out what part sets the color of these monochrome bitmaps?

    It’s not that hard to find and I have documented it on my blog as well.

  22. NBC

    “Nope, PDF provides for a much better approach. You can set the color of the monochrome bitmap. Of course it does only B&W it’s an imagemask… “

    As always NBC is clueless.

    So you didn’t read that very professional report that Mara Zebest published over a year ago where she worked all of this color stuff out ? That was the one that described in great detail how the colors of the 1 Bit layers are not B & W but are a different monochrome near-Black color for each 1 Bit layer. And then she verified the color values for each layer with the eyedropper tool and showed how that was handled in the lines of PDF code.

    And the one thing that she reported, that I’m still scratching my head over, is how that eydropper tool measured the same RGB color values, no matter where the eyedropper was placed onto each 1 Bit layer. So it measures the same near-Black color numbers when the eyedropper is placed over a “transparent” region of the image mask as when it is placed onto a near-Black text character. So one measures near-Black when the eyedropper tool is placed onto a 1 Bit layer over a region of White Halo on the background layer.

    Maybe you should talk to your Xerox guy about all this.

  23. So you didn’t read that very professional report that Mara Zebest published over a year ago where she worked all of this color stuff out ? That was the one that described in great detail how the colors of the 1 Bit layers are not B & W but are a different monochrome near-Black color for each 1 Bit layer. And then she verified the color values for each layer with the eyedropper tool and showed how that was handled in the lines of PDF code.

    I am quite familiar with Mara’s unfortunate report where she showed herself to be less than clear on many of the work flow related issues. Indeed, the colors of the bitmaps are not B&W, geez, I have posted on that and shown how they get their color…

    To understand you need to look at the raw or parsed PDF.

    I did and understand… You? Not so much it seems.

    Come on Hermitian, please figure this out by yourself, this is just getting too embarrassing for me.

  24. PS: The xerox workflow created document shows similar monochrome bitmaps set to a specific color through a PDF command. Thanks for pointing out yet another confirmation of my findings.

    You’re the best.

    PS: Do you want the color values in integer or floating point value? Do you need me to also show you the corresponding color?

  25. And since I do feel sorry for our friend, here is a quote from the PDF standard

    However, if the image dictionary’s ImageMask entry is true, the sample data shall be interpreted as a stencil mask for applying the graphics state’s nonstroking colour parameters (see 8.9.6.2, “Stencil Masking”).

    and

    An image mask (an image XObject whose ImageMask entry is true) is a monochrome image in which each sample is specified by a single bit. However, instead of being painted in opaque black and white, the image mask is treated as a stencil mask that is partly opaque and partly transparent. Sample values in the image do not represent black and white pixels; rather, they designate places on the page that should either be marked with the current colour or masked out (not marked at all). Areas that are masked out retain their former contents. The effect is like applying paint in the current colour through a cut-out stencil, which lets the paint reach the page in some places and masks it out in others.

    I wonder if Hermitian will apologize for his ignorance as to how this all works in practice…

    This has all already been looked at and confirmed. You are leagues behind and out of them too.

  26. Maybe you should talk to your Xerox guy about all this.

    Or maybe you should come up to speed with how PDF’s are created and rendered… It’s complex but not insurmountably so.

  27. Since Hermie is so incompetent, I’ll throw him a bone:

    ‘q Q
    q 18 14.40002 576 763.2 re W n
    q 0 -792.96 612.48 0 -0.24 792.48 cm /Im1 Do Q
    /Cs1 cs 0.1059 0.17650 0.1216 sc
    q 0 -348.96 436.56 0 89.28 581.28 cm /Im2 Do Q
    q 0.34510 0.3922 0.3529 sc
    q 0 -47.76 186.72 0 304.56 108.96 cm /Im3 Do Q
    q 0.302 0.34510 0.3216 sc
    q 0 -10.08 65.76 0 170.16 89.76 cm /Im4 Do Q
    q 0.2549 0.3373 0.2627 sc
    q 0 -29.52 54.72 0 440.4 274.08 cm /Im5 Do Q
    0.3412 0.4353 0.3412 sc
    q 0 -11.28 51.84 0 103.44 254.88 cm /Im6 Do Q
    0.2549 0.3373 0.2627 sc
    q 0 -8.16 16.8 0 349.68 322.08 cm /Im7 Do Q
    0.9412 0.9725 0.9216 sc
    q 0 -58.32 52.08 0 176.16 185.76 cm /Im8 Do Q
    /Cs2 cs 0.9647 sc
    q 0 -31.68 34.08 0 251.76 784.8 cm /Im9 Do Q
    Q

    I’ll even give him a hint: the last color is greyscale, and the first image is not monochrome. Note that this also contains the rotation, scaling, and xy offsets of the images.

  28. A perplexing and potentially very troublesome problem affecting Xerox scanners has been explained and fixed, thanks to some sleuthing by a savvy software engineer — and a bit of viral attention on the Internet.

    D. Kriesel, a German Ph.D. student studying computational geometry, encountered a strange problem when scanning a blueprint on a common Xerox office scanner. The numbers denoting the square footage of rooms were totally wrong, and what’s more, they changed when he scanned the blueprint again.

    But it was real, and looking at all the data, it quickly became clear what the culprit was: an image compression algorithm called JBIG2, built into the scanner as the “normal” quality option for those who wanted to save a bit of space on their hard drive (versus “high” and “higher,” which made for much bigger files).

    Unlike an analog photocopier, or a digital one that simply records the black-and-white values of pixels, JBIG2 examines the whole image and finds pieces that are highly similar, replacing them with a sort of clone-stamped version that saves space. Examples of such pieces of an image might be the pattern on some wallpaper or the top of a fence — or, as it turns out, small letters and numbers that look similar, like 6s and 8s.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/copier-conundrum-xerox-machines-swap-numbers-during-scans-6C10860706

  29. I’ll even give him a hint: the last color is greyscale, and the first image is not monochrome. Note that this also contains the rotation, scaling, and xy offsets of the images.

    even a blind man should have been able to find it but I appreciate your kindness. Sometimes I find it hard to believe that Hermitian cannot find these data…
    Then again, he continues to surprise me.

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